Water District lawsuit jeopardizes future projects

The Santa Clara Valley Water District made a grave miscalculation in suing the State Water Board over the Bay Delta Water Quality Control Plan. By alienating the remnants of the environmental community who have supported them in recent years, they are jeopardizing future projects and funding measures that will require voter approval.

Santa Clara County residents care deeply about the environment. A public opinion poll conducted by San Jose State University found that environmental protection was the top motivator for people to conserve water.

Similarly, a poll commissioned by the Water District found that 84% of those surveyed believed the following argument was convincing: “Using recycled water is good for our environment. The more recycled water we use, the less we have to take out of rivers and streams and our scarce groundwater supplies. That’s good for rivers, streams, and the fish, plants and wildlife that rely on them.”

In the same poll, statements about the importance of protecting water supply and being prepared for droughts each received 73% – 11 points lower than the environmental argument. The survey also found that environmentalists and medical professionals are the best messengers for delivering the benefits of potable reuse (purifying wastewater to augment drinking water supply).

The Water District had little to gain and a lot to lose by suing the State Water Board. To recap the lawsuit, on December 12 the Water Board adopted new instream flow standards for the lower San Joaquin River and its three main tributaries, including the Tuolumne River. This was the first of several revisions to the Bay Delta Water Quality Control Plan, which hasn’t been updated since 1995. Meanwhile the San Francisco Bay-Delta ecosystem – starved of freshwater inflow – has spiraled into collapse.

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) relies on the Tuolumne (which fills the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir) for most of its water. The Water District’s supply, on the other hand, was not directly affected by the Water Board’s decision. However, with the SFPUC providing 15% of the water used in Santa Clara County, the District apparently felt the need to intervene.

Rather than conduct its own analysis, the District simply accepted the SFPUC’s narrative, which is based on false and misleading information. In reality, the SFPUC has little to worry about. At current water demand, the SFPUC could manage any drought on record, even with the new flow standards in place. Yet the SFPUC claims the Bay Delta Plan could lead to 40 to 50% rationing. How could this be possible?

The answer is that the SFPUC has manufactured a “design drought,” which arbitrarily couples two of the worst droughts from the last century. They also assume water demand will increase by 26% to support all of the development projected for the region. Under their policy, every year is either the beginning or middle of the “design drought,” so severe rationing would have to begin immediately. Even if all of their reservoirs were full – enough water to last six years – people would be forced to ration.

The Water District, on the other hand, currently plans for a three-year drought, yet they appear to accept the SFPUC’s 8.5-year “design drought” scenario as prudent. It would be virtually impossible for the Water District to manage such a drought, so they better hope their customers don’t demand similar planning.

When people learn that the water they conserve, or the recycled water they’re asked to drink, does not benefit the environment, but instead just enables more development, they will think twice about who and what they vote for. The Water District must do more than feign concern for the environment. If they want support from the environmental community, they would be wise to drop their lawsuit immediately.

Peter Drekmeier is the Policy Director for the Tuolumne River Trust. He formerly served on the Palo Alto City Council and Santa Clara Valley Water Commission.

 

Original article: Mercury News (January 23, 2019) https://www.mercurynews.com/2019/01/23/opinion-water-district-lawsuit-jeopardizes-future-projects/

Photo Courtesy of Dino Vournas

State Water Board Approves Bay Delta Plan, 40% Flows

The vote is in!

On Wednesday, the State of California Water Resources Control Board approved mandatory flow requirements on the Tuolumne starting at 40% (between February and June). The 4-1 vote came after 10 hours of testimony and deliberation.

Other state agencies used typical bait-and-switch tactics at a glorified attempt of demonstrating good faith “collaboration over conflict” with their proposed “compromise” agreement. Don’t be fooled by this cloying.

As our Policy Director, Peter Drekmeier, shares, “The proposed Tuolumne River settlement is essentially what the water agencies have been offering for the past few years, and we know it won’t work. Similar proposals in the past have always failed due to the lack of adequate instream flows.”

As the “powerful bloc” (and uncanny bedfellows) of SF Water, Power, Sewer (SFPUC) and Central Valley irrigation districts prepare to counter attack with the help of the Trump administration, we must remain vigilant.

Many thanks to our allies and friends Trout UnlimitedNRDCThe Bay Institute, California Sportfishing Protection Alliance, Friends of the San Francisco EstuaryGolden Gate Salmon AssociationFriends of the RiverSan Francisco BaykeeperDefenders of WildlifePacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s AssociationsAmerican RiversRestore the DeltaSierra Club

2018 Bike Theft

Since we learned of the theft of over 20 bicycles, helmets, tools, life jackets, and other gear yesterday morning, we have been touched by the generosity of the community, businesses, and individuals who have jumped in to help.

The loss of the bicycles affects the whole community. Children and families ride them to get to school safely through the Safe Routes to School program. Youth learn to ride, repair, and gain leadership skills by teaching their peers what they’ve learned. Community members of all ages use the bikes to explore the local river parks at events like Modesto Rec Fest and Family Days in the Park.

Despite this loss, many have offered their support, including:

  • Orville Wright Elementary, and Healthy Start, and the Modesto City School District.
  • Modesto Police Department.
  • Deputy Nate Crain, Stanislaus County Sheriff’s K9 Association, and Brian Zahra, owner of Fun Sports Modesto, who are supplying 10 new bikes, helmets, and other supplies.
  • Tracy Police Department and Tracy WalMart are donating 9 bikes.
  • Modesto Bee and Fox 40 for covering the story and helping spread the word.

We are so grateful for this outpouring of support. If you are interested in joining the rebuilding efforts, we are still in need of several items like pedal wrenches, bike stands, socket sets, ratchet sets, etc.

These are valued at approximately $1,500. While we accept donations of items, we do not have a place to store them until the school district reopens on January 14th. Until then, we gratefully accept donations to help us purchase these items and cover costs associated with rebuilding the gear closet.

We appreciate the generosity of everyone who has stepped up to ensure we have the gear necessary to continue these important programs in 2019. Please help us restore this gear closet for our community.

To make a donation, please click here or click the orange “Donate” button at the top of this page. If you are interested in donating an item, please get in touch with Edgar Garibay, edgar@tuolumne.org.

We appreciate you!

TRT and DACA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 7, 2017

For more information, contact:
Patrick Koepele
Executive Director
209-588-8636
patrick@tuolumne.org

The Tuolumne River Trust issued the following statement:

As a nonprofit conservation organization, we work tirelessly to ensure we have a healthy and safe environment for current and future generations. Much of our work is focused on clean and safe water, land, and air so that people of all races, cultures, ethnicities and income levels have the best chance to live a healthy and prosperous life so that they may best contribute to a vibrant American society.

Much of our work is conducted by, and directly benefits, those who immigrated to the United States as children and have grown up in this country as Americans. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals- DACA- program has allowed them to remain in this country without fear of deportation, until now.

The Tuolumne River Trust stands with these young people whose parents brought them here to pursue the American dream. They were granted permission to live and work legally in America. They have passed background checks. They are our neighbors and co-workers, our friends and family.

We are a country of people who help one another in crisis. We don’t turn our backs. We don’t close our doors. We need Congress to stand up to the president and do the same.

To our Congressional leaders we say that DACA should be upheld, continued, and expanded. This is both a moral imperative and a national necessity. America needs talent – and these people, who have been raised and educated in the United States, are already part of our national community and are American in every way except on paper. They represent what is best about America, and they are essential to our future.