2018 Bike Theft

Since we learned of the theft of over 20 bicycles, helmets, tools, life jackets, and other gear yesterday morning, we have been touched by the generosity of the community, businesses, and individuals who have jumped in to help.

The loss of the bicycles affects the whole community. Children and families ride them to get to school safely through the Safe Routes to School program. Youth learn to ride, repair, and gain leadership skills by teaching their peers what they’ve learned. Community members of all ages use the bikes to explore the local river parks at events like Modesto Rec Fest and Family Days in the Park.

Despite this loss, many have offered their support, including:

  • Orville Wright Elementary, and Healthy Start, and the Modesto City School District.
  • Modesto Police Department.
  • Deputy Nate Crain, Stanislaus County Sheriff’s K9 Association, and Brian Zahra, owner of Fun Sports Modesto, who are supplying 10 new bikes, helmets, and other supplies.
  • Tracy Police Department and Tracy WalMart are donating 9 bikes.
  • Modesto Bee and Fox 40 for covering the story and helping spread the word.

We are so grateful for this outpouring of support. If you are interested in joining the rebuilding efforts, we are still in need of several items like pedal wrenches, bike stands, socket sets, ratchet sets, etc.

These are valued at approximately $1,500. While we accept donations of items, we do not have a place to store them until the school district reopens on January 14th. Until then, we gratefully accept donations to help us purchase these items and cover costs associated with rebuilding the gear closet.

We appreciate the generosity of everyone who has stepped up to ensure we have the gear necessary to continue these important programs in 2019. Please help us restore this gear closet for our community.

To make a donation, please click here or click the orange “Donate” button at the top of this page. If you are interested in donating an item, please get in touch with Edgar Garibay, edgar@tuolumne.org.

We appreciate you!

Survey finds San Francisco’s water priorities are out of sync with the environmental values of its constituents

People conserve water assuming their actions will benefit the environment. However, in San Francisco and much of the Bay Area, this is not the case.

A recent public opinion poll of 402 San Francisco voters found that environmental protection is a strong motivating force for water conservation. The survey was commissioned by Tuolumne River Trust, and conducted by the Social Science Research Center.

93% of respondents said they personally conserved water during the recent drought. Of those, 94% said protecting the environment played a role in their actions. When asked if they would be more likely to conserve water if they knew it benefitted the environment, 72% responded yes. Conversely, only 21% said they would be more likely to conserve water if it only enabled more development.

“Unfortunately, the water we conserved during the recent 5-year drought did not benefit the environment,” said Peter Drekmeier, Policy Director for the Tuolumne River Trust. “Instead, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) hoarded it behind dams, only to dump it during last year’s near-record precipitation. The Tuolumne River experienced one excessive year of flows at the expense of five terrible years.”

While 75% of respondents could identify Hetch Hetchy as the source of their drinking water, only 12% could identify the Tuolumne River as the source that fills the Reservoir. The Hetch Hetchy Water System, which provides water to 2.7 million people in San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Alameda Counties, is managed by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC).

“The SFPUC has done a great job at branding Hetch Hetchy, but has failed to educate its customers about the Tuolumne River, which is the true source of their water,” said Drekmeier. “Saying our water comes from Hetch Hetchy is like saying our food comes from the grocery store.”

Staff at the SFPUC have been advocating against a proposed plan by the State Water Resources Control Board that would help restore the Tuolumne River and San Francisco Bay.

“The way the SFPUC manages its dams and reservoirs is clearly out of sync with the environmental values of its constituents,” said Drekmeier. “The SFPUC has opposed measures, such as revisions to the Bay Delta Water Quality Control Plan, aimed at restoring the San Francisco Bay-Delta and rivers that feed it.”

One reason the SFPUC has opposed the Bay Delta Plan, which would increase freshwater inflows into San Francisco Bay, is because it is planning to accommodate a rapid increase in commercial development in the coming years – a vision that is not embraced by a majority of San Francisco voters. 60% of survey respondents were unsupportive of creating more office space in San Francisco.

When asked about Plan Bay Area – a government-initiated roadmap that forecasts the addition of 1.3 million new jobs and 2 million more people to the Bay Area between 2010 and 2040 – only 11% of survey respondents believed the Plan would improve their quality of life, while 65% believed it would negatively impact their quality of life.

When asked if they would favor changing the way SFPUC Commissioners are appointed, more than twice as many people favored making the positions elected versus the status quo. The commissioners are currently appointed by the Mayor and approved by the Board of Supervisors.

Read the full results of the survey here: TRT Final Survey Report 06-29-18

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By Land and By River: Yosemite Backpacking at May Lake and Mt. Hoffman

Tioga Road ferries thousands of RV’s, car-campers, and tourists across Yosemite.  Its smooth asphalt and expansive vistas invite even the most urban visitor to appreciate their surroundings and feel connected to nature. But as we turned off Tioga onto the two-mile, one-land road to the May Lake trailhead, we could sense we were entering into a different part of Yosemite. At the trailhead, we shared a parking lot with High Sierra campers, equestrians, and all different kinds of intrepid explorers. With our packs cinched up and full of clothes, food, and bear canisters, we hit the trail for our 1.2 mile climb to the lake.

Continue reading “By Land and By River: Yosemite Backpacking at May Lake and Mt. Hoffman”

By Land & By River: Tuolumne Whitewater

By Noah Baker, TRT intern

8:30 AM just outside Groveland, California, the last town before Yosemite National Park. The sun is already blazing as four arriving groups congregate at the foot of a wooden lodge. The crew from ARTA River Trips brings out a dry bag for each person to stuff their belongings into and fiddle with folding a good seal. An awkward meet and greet, the potpourri mixes then proceeds onto a worn, yellow school bus. It is time to embark on a rafting adventure. Continue reading “By Land & By River: Tuolumne Whitewater”