From The Desk Of The Executive Director

By Patrick Koepele

As I reflect on the progress TRT has made since its founding in 1981, I see wonderful people dedicated to ensuring that the Tuolumne River remains healthy with abundant fish and wildlife; and a river that is able to provide unique recreational experiences to diverse communities. As a world-class river that transects world-class regions from the sublime wilderness of Yosemite to the most dynamic and productive farmland in the Central Valley, to the world’s tech-hub in the San Francisco Bay Area, this river binds us together despite our differences.

TRT has been working hard to engage communities across this landscape in river stewardship. One such group are residents of riverside communities in Modesto, including the Airport Neighborhood, South Modesto, and West Modesto. These are the people who live closest to the river and, arguably, have most to benefit from its health. Despite their physical proximity to the river, these communities have not been well-represented in discussions about river protection and restoration. We have been working tirelessly for more than 10 years to change that dynamic.

In 2005, TRT commissioned a focus group of residents of these neighborhoods to better understand their views of the Tuolumne River and how they feel connected or disconnected from it. While many participants in the focus groups described the river as a dangerous place, most could envision it becoming a vibrant and important focal point for the community, given enough time and care.

A walkable and bikeable trail system has been constructed from Gateway Park to Carpenter Road. Dennett Dam has been removed. And importantly, residents from these neighborhoods are speaking up in support of the river! They have argued for better parks, improved sidewalks, and bike lanes to connect to the park, and better policies to care for the river through the Bay Delta and dam relicensing proceedings.

We believe that these neighborhoods have a symbiotic relationship with the river: the health of one depends on the health of the other. Thus, we must continue to bridge the connection between residents of riverside neighborhoods and the river and its parks. As the river and its parks improve, residents will have better places to enjoy with their families and friends. As the neighborhoods improve, safety and other concerns will subside. Not to mention youth from these neighborhoods are becoming tomorrow’s river stewards and protectors by engaging in this work through our various programs.

Fast-forward to today and, thanks to TRT supporters like you, we see a river and neighborhoods that are changing. Monthly river cleanups by volunteers and local businesses are encouraging citizen stewardship through the Adopt-Our-River program.

We look forward to strengthening this work – it’s essential for the health of the river and our communities. I hope you’ll join us at a river cleanup, tree planting workday, or for a bike ride along the beautiful Tuolumne River to see how far we’ve come!